Maria Montessori Essay

Maria Montessori Essay-14
In every Montessori classroom, the space is divided into five distinct thematic areas, each of which is designed to promote one of the main principles of the Montessori method.These are as follows: There is therefore a very useful emphasis in Montessori's work on the individuality and learning potential of every child, including children who have physical, mental or emotional challenges to overcome.

In every Montessori classroom, the space is divided into five distinct thematic areas, each of which is designed to promote one of the main principles of the Montessori method.These are as follows: There is therefore a very useful emphasis in Montessori's work on the individuality and learning potential of every child, including children who have physical, mental or emotional challenges to overcome.

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Much early work by Montessori, and by her international critics and supporters, uses vocabulary such as "deficients" or "idiots" (Montessori, 1912, p.

42), for example, to refer to children with learning difficulties or disabilities.

This means that care must be taken when reading Montessori's own writings, especially in passages which expound her somewhat reactionary views on matters such as intelligence, racial qualities, and some aspects of gender, race and class.

Montessori writes about "the instruction and education of man" (Montessori, 1912, p.

She realised that there were few suitable educational methods and materials for children with disabilities and so she took some time out from her medical work to study the history of educational theory and some branches of anthropology and philosophy, in the hope of developing a scientific approach to the education of children with disabilities.

Montessori was living in Rome in 1906 and she was asked to set up some small-scale provision for the pre-school children of working people which came to be known as the (House of the Children).The method encourages independence, and though this was radical at the time when the first Montessori schools were created, it chimes very well with contemporary ideas about children's learning.One limitation of the Montessori method in its original form is that it incorporates some views which were commonly held by most European educators in the early twentieth century, but which are no longer regarded as ethically acceptable in modern schooling.One key insight informs the whole of Montessori's theory: the idea that all children have innate qualities that enable them to relate to each other and to the world around them, and that these qualities were being restricted rather than enhanced by the prevailing educational methods of the time.She wanted to nurture and draw out these inner qualities of the child, rather than impose learning upon them in a forceful way.Another important dimension of the Montessori theory is the idea that children learn in stages, and must progress to the end of one stage, before moving on to the next.The stages were defined in terms of sensitive periods in which particular types of learning will most easily take place.There is an emphasis on freedom to explore and learn at the child's own pace, and an expectation that physical and emotional learning will take place as well as the academic type of learning.The application of Montessori's ideas is called the Montessori method and it is "characterized by multi-age classrooms, a special set of educational materials, student-chosen work in long time blocks, collaboration, the absence of grades and tests, and individual and small group instruction in both academic and social skills" (Lillard and Else-Quest, 2006, p. The environment in which learning takes place is fundamentally important in Montessori-inspired education.This environment provides plenty of opportunity to observe others who have reached a higher stage of development, and also allows children to give and receive assistance in all their learning activities.Montessori believed in a latent capacity that exists within every human being, and did not approve of artificial prizes and punishments that are designed to modify human behaviour.

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