John Q Movie Essay

John Q Movie Essay-43
He gains control with a gun (Later, we learn that it is unloaded), pulls chains from a duffel bag to padlock the doors, and makes it known that in exchange for the release of hostages, the administration is to grant permission for his son's heart transplant.

He gains control with a gun (Later, we learn that it is unloaded), pulls chains from a duffel bag to padlock the doors, and makes it known that in exchange for the release of hostages, the administration is to grant permission for his son's heart transplant.

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For movie watchers able to suspend their disbelief, identify with the human dynamics of the story, and tolerate a one-sided caricature of health care—particularly with respect to HMOs—John Q provides suspenseful entertainment.

In response to its absence of thoughtful critique on the shortcomings of the of the U. health care delivery system (arguably, not the task of this movie), viewers may wish to consider the central issue of the movie from a more ordered perspective. The purpose of this reflection is to provide a more nuanced context for viewers who want to think in greater depth about family responsibility for health care.

Although responsibility for arranging for treatment theoretically might be assigned to the family of the person in ill health, the practical reality is that high-cost treatment is inaccessible to most families. S., health insurance—for those covered by it—is employer-based.

The basic premise of insurance is that people are grouped into heterogeneous risk pools based on something other than their state of health, such as their place of employment.

Free public education up to grade 12 is provided for those who wish to attend and because of its importance, it is mandatory up to age 16.

When medical care is seen from that perspective, public policy would have to determine the limits of "basic medical care." What would be comparable to "grade 12"?People who receive poor or no medical care are sometimes healthy; others who receive the very best medical care die.In considering medical care as a right, then, one basis for determining how much of it should be available to members of society might be equity.The astounded father can only say "But I have insurance," in response to the news that the critical transplant is not covered.His next panicked move is to convert virtually all of the family's saleable assets to cash to meet the hospital administrator's requirement of an up-front deposit to assure a place for the boy on the transplant list.The amount of cash raised falls short of the mark, and time is running out.Prompted by his wife's plea that he "do something," John Q arrives at the hospital Emergency Department ready for action.After that fact emerges, the father then explores coverage by government programs and possible donation of services by the hospital.It is only when neither of those is available, that the father takes on the system in order to force provision of the transplant.This work is protected by copyright and may be linked to without seeking permission.Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically. For more information, read Michigan Publishing's access and usage policy. The author explores the public perception of current U. health care, the distinction between medical care and health, and the ethics of health care decisions.

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